Food Safety and Nutrition

Safety

Pocket Herbs & Produce is committed to food safety. All of our crops are grown from Non-GMO seed. Pocket Herbs & Produce is a registered growing and packing facility with Freshcare, the Australian on-farm assurance program. We will be applying for the HACCP based Food Safety Management Programme in 2017. We strive to be on the forefront of food safety and make it a part of our everyday culture; our families, staff and friends eat the produce we grow.

No Pesticides or Chemicals

No chemical pesticides or herbicides are used at Pocket Herbs in growing our products. We utilize organic registered products on a needs only basis. We prefer this to toxic chemicals.

Testing

As part of our Food Safety Plan we have our products tested for pathogens on a regular basis to ensure the safest product available. We also test our water sources to confirm it is of the quality we need and expect for our operation. All testing is done by an independent third party accredited lab at Southern Cross University, Lismore.

Nutrition

Micro Greens/Baby Leaf Herbs are one of the most concentrated natural sources of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, trace elements, amino-acids and proteins on Earth.

Microgreens have been found to contain higher levels of concentrated active compounds than found in mature plants or seeds.  These tiny baby plants provide a convenient and concentrated means for absorbing the active compounds when eaten or made into a health drink which is commonly done with wheatgrass.

Our micro greens typically provide the following nutrients: Vitamins A, B, C, E and K, Calcium, Chlorophyll, Iron, Lecithin, Magnesium, Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5), Phosphorus, Potassium, Amino Acids, Trace Elements, Antioxidants and Proteins. As you can see Microgreens are extremely nutritious and healthy!

At Pocket Herbs & Produce we grow in a greenhouse where growing conditions mean there are virtually no threats such as disease and grazing animals.

Microgreens encapsulate the unique transitional plant development phase between sprout and baby green. The micro green has evolved to survive in a hostile world: grazing animals (e.g. Insects) or other cryptogrammic organisms (e.g. fungi, bacteria) with little protective armour – they rely on antioxidants and phyto-chemicals to ward off such threats. Possibly this is what makes them so uniquely tasty.

“Seeds contain two main classes of chemical: Carbohydrates and Lipids; as well as, proteins; non-protein N-compounds, and minerals. Many specific plant products are present in specific seeds. For example glycosides as such as mustard oil. Much speculation exists about the role of such compounds, and there is at least some evidence that they protect the plant against predators.” 
Reference: Seed notes from Meyer and Polijakof, Germination of Seeds, Pergamon Press (1989).

Micro Greens/Baby Leaf Herbs are therefore plants that are in transition from the sprouted embryo, reliant on its seed store; to a ‘stand alone’ organism, later developing its new root and leaf systems. As such, micro greens have a blend of phyto-chemicals inherited from both the seed and derived from the fledgling green plant – the unique flavour combination neither found in sprouts nor baby greens. And this is what makes them so special!

Nutrition Facts

In 2010 a study (J. AMER.SOC.HORT.SCI. 135(3):223–229. 201) published in the Journal of American Society for Horticultural Science reported young lettuce plants, harvested 7 days after germination, had the highest antioxidant capacity and health-promoting phenolic compounds, compared with mature leaves from the same plant.

In 2012 the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry reported a large-scale university study ‘Assessment of Vitamin and Carotenoid Concentrations of Emerging Food Products: Edible Microgreens ‘ See comment in PubMed Commons belowJ Agric Food Chem. 2012 Aug 8;60(31):7644-51. doi: 10.1021/jf300459b. Epub 2012 Jul 30. Analysing the nutrient composition of 25 microgreen varieties. They discovered that microgreen cotyledon leaves had considerably higher nutritional densities than their mature counterparts (cotyledon leaves first leaves of a seedling driven from the seed).

The 2012 microgreen study ‘also found substantial amounts of tocopherols in microgreens. The amount of alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol combined ranged from 7.9 to 126.8 milligrams per 100 grams, with green daikon radish microgreens scoring the highest value in this analysis. The recommended daily allowance in adults for vitamin E is 15 milligrams of alpha-tocopherol, this means eating just a small amount of daikon radish microgreens would cover your daily requirement for this important antioxidant vitamin, far better than a tablet.

In 2012 a study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on vitamin C levels in microgreens reported that even the worst performing sample taken contained a whopping 20 milligrams of vitamin C per 100 grams – almost twice the amount of vitamin C found in tomatoes! Among the tested varieties Red cabbage microgreens had the highest levels of vitamin C, with a 100-gram portion providing 147 milligrams – or 245% of the daily value – of this vital nutrient. For comparison, an equal-sized serving of mature raw red cabbage contains 57 milligrams of vitamin C according to their data.

The 2012 microgreen study looked at the levels of phyllo Quinone (the type of vitamin K produced by plants) in different microgreens, and found the highest levels of vitamin K in amaranth microgreens (Red Garnet variety). The researchers observed marked differences in vitamin K concentration between different microgreens, with the values ranging from 0.6 to 4.1 micrograms per gram.

Vitamin K plays an important role in humans by maintaining strong and healthy bones, avoiding blood clotting (great if you’re a frequent flier) and preventing bruising.

According to the 2012 study some microgreens contain even more beta-carotene than carrots: 12 milligrams per 100 grams compared to 8 milligrams in boiled carrots, The researchers also found that microgreens also provide other carotenoids such as lutein and zeaxanthin.

Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are thought to reduce the risk of disease, particularly eye disease and types of cancer.

As you can see Microgreens are extremely nutritious and healthy.

http://www.alternet.org/food/microgreens-powerful-plants

http://www.healwithfood.org/health-benefits/microgreens-nutrition.php